Monday, 5 September 2011

MIDDLE ENGLISH PROSE:


v            MIDDLE ENGLISH PROSE:

v      1) Ancrene Riwle:

* It means ‘Rules for the Anchoresses’.

* It is written probably in 1225 perhaps by Bishop Poore of Salisbury.

* It has come down to us in English French and Latin versions and possibly the English Version is original.

* It is a book of ex excellent religious advice and comfort written for three ladies who wished to live a religious life, without, however, becoming nuns or entering any religious orders.

* It has eight distinct books. They are written in tradition of old English Homiletic prose. They also give some advice on domestic matters relating food, clothing etc.

* The work is remarkable for its proverbial quality its bestiary allusions, its familiar illustrations from everyday life, its common metaphor and above all its humour. 



v            2) The Ayenbite of Inwyt:

* It is written by Dan Michel of Northgate in 1340.

* It is a translation of French work.

* It has no literary value but from the linguistic point of view it is the most important text in South-eastern and more particularly the Kentish dialect.

1 comment:

  1. how prose developed in middle english?

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